Get ASX Price


Liability limited by scheme approved under Professional Standards Legislation

Latest News
Hot Issues
Business confidence hits 5-month high: NAB
Caution advised on best interests duty with cryptocurrencies
$20,000 asset write-off renewed for another financial year.
SMSF compliance traps with bitcoin
Where Australia is at. Our leading indicators.
Foreign resident CGT withholding: early recognition of tax credit
ATO set to doorknock as 60% of cash-heavy businesses caught
New downsizing cap available
Capital Gains and Renounceable Rights
Treasury finds Australia 'increasingly uncompetitive' as US moves on tax plans
Australia's vital statistics
Our Advent calendar for 2017
SMSFs warned on ‘ticking time bomb’ with outdated deeds
Taxation ruling on commercial website deductibility
68% of SMEs ‘significantly stressed,’ 85% rely on accountants
Statutory wills are underutilised in estate planning
Small business slips on lodgement deadlines
300,000 SMEs utilising $20K write-off, says ATO
Articles archive
Quarter 4 October - December 2017
Quarter 3 July - September 2017
Quarter 2 April - June 2017
Quarter 1 January - March 2017
Quarter 4 October - December 2016
Quarter 3 July - September 2016
Quarter 2 April - June 2016
Quarter 1 January - March 2016
Quarter 4 October - December 2015
Quarter 3 July - September 2015
Quarter 2 April - June 2015
Quarter 1 January - March 2015
Quarter 4 October - December 2014
‘Bank-like heists’ make way for new wave of cyber crime

WARNING:  Identity theft is an increasingly popular method of cyber crime as opposed to “bank-like heists” of the past, and SMSF trustees are a prime target, according to a university professor.



       


 


Professor Matthew Warren, deputy director at the Deakin University Centre for Cyber Security Research, told SMSF Adviser cyber criminals are no longer simply after stealing lump sums by cracking through security systems.


Instead, criminals aim for identity theft, which allows them to assume the identity of the client and transfer funds out into a different account, going under the radar of SMSF firms on the lookout for suspicious external activity.


“Attackers wouldn’t necessarily go after superannuation funds to extract large sums of money in a single transaction because they know identity theft and assuming the identity of customers of those organisations would just be as successful,” he said.


Professor Warren said there is more than one route of attack facing trustees, but more often than not, the pathway is based around identity theft utilising a social engineering method.


“A social engineering attack is when you are trying to manipulate people’s actions in terms of a social context whether it’s via email, whether it’s phoning someone and pretending to be someone else or whether it is physically going into an organisation,” said Professor Warren.


“So in terms of threats you are not seeing one particular type of threat but you are now seeing the sophistication of attackers develop a number of different threat strategies into a single attack.”


 


 


KATARINA TAURIAN AND JOTHAM LIAN
Tuesday, 13 Jun 2017
accountantsdaily.com.au




30th-June-2017
 

Agostinelli Perlen
Phone: (03) 9654 2022 // Fax: (03) 9654 2044 // Email: info@agpe.com.au

Disclaimer | Privacy Statement